Updated news on the Gambino, Genovese, Bonanno, Lucchese, and Colombo Organized Crime Families of New York City.

Wednesday, March 23, 2011

Mob-busting ex-FBI agent Lindley DeVecchio rips Brooklyn DA Charles Hynes' office in new book


Former FBI agent Lindley DeVecchio (left) suggests Brooklyn DA Charles Hynes (right) was 'always more interested in publicity than doing his job' in new book.
Former FBI agent Lindley DeVecchio (left) suggests Brooklyn DA Charles Hynes (right) was 'always more interested in publicity than doing his job' in new book.
 
Mob-busting former FBI agent Lindley DeVecchio beat a murder rap in 2007 - and now he's settling a few scores in a new book.
DeVecchio, who was accused of advising mob informer Greg Scarpa to whack four turncoats, says the Brooklyn district attorney's office was bamboozled by convicts who hoped DeVecchio's downfall would help their appeals.
He takes direct aim at controversial prosecutor Michael Vecchione, whose case went up in smoke when it was revealed in midtrial that the main witness was lying.
DeVecchio's description of his first meeting with Vecchione drips with venom.
"Despite having never seen him, I could tell who he was right away," he writes in "We're Going to Win This Thing: The Shocking Frame-Up of a Mafia Crime Buster."
"Dark-skinned, vacant-eyed, with an aggressive, bulky body topped by a moon face and a graying crew cut. He always seemed to be on the verge of toppling forward.
"He had one of those rock star beards that never grows more than a quarter-inch and endows the wearer with a degenerate look. Someone should tell him that it looks ridiculous on a middle-aged man with a potbelly."
DeVecchio said the heavyweight legal battle was set up so that "Vecchione was going to be the good Italian and I was going to be the bad Italian."
DA Charles Hynes, who called DeVecchio's indictment the most stunning example of official corruption he'd ever seen, also gets slammed.
DeVecchio suggests that Hynes, "always more interested in publicity than doing his job," was hoping that prosecuting an ex-agent would promote a novel he'd written.
Vecchione had also inked a six-figure book contract about the NYPD "Mafia Cops" case, which was ultimately taken over by the feds.
"Win or lose the trial against me ... the book writers in the DA's office would still win," DeVecchio snipes.
Jerry Schmetterer, a spokesman for the DA, declined to comment.


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